Identifying Simple Language Techniques

Simple Language Techniques

Many of the techniques in this video for Simple Language Techniques are basic, but it’s essential you are able to identify and discuss all of them to aid in English studies and how you analyse texts.

Techniques

Techniques
Alliteration / Assonance
Hyperbole
Tone / Mood
Imagery
Repetition / Rhyme
Onomatopoeia

Alliteration / Assonance

Alliteration and Assonance
Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds.
Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds.
e.g. Peter Pauper picked a pair of pickled pears.
Paul approached the proposal with apprehension.

Hyperbole

Hyperbole
Hyperbole is when a writer exaggerates an idea, person, a thing or an event for dramatic effect.
e.g. He was almost knee-high to an ant.
I could touch the sky I was so happy.

Tone / Mood

Tone and Mood
Tone / mood refers to how reading or viewing something makes an audience feel.
Usually can be described with a ‘feeling’ word.
e.g. The author adopts a sombre tone to represent her loss.
The film uses colour and music create a positive mood.

Imagery

Imagery refers to adjectives, images or descriptions chosen by an author to represent an idea or event.
e.g. Author uses imagery such as crooked trees and sneering gargoyles to represent the house as ‘haunted’.

Repetition / Rhyme

Repetition and Rhyme
Repetition refers to an idea or feature being used more than once.
Rhyme refers to how sounds are repeated in words.
e.g. The author repeats the cat to show her childhood.
She uses an ABAB rhyming pattern to quicken the reader’s pace.

Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia refers to how words can be used to represent sounds or noises themselves.
e.g. ‘Boom’, ‘Crash’, ‘Roar’.
The muttering became a roar and like the crack of thunder they cheered.

Summary

It is essential to be able to identify techniques to succeed in your English studies.
In preparation for any exam, ensure you know how to identify and name each technique.

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