Text-type Conventions | Critical Studies | HSC English

Text-type Conventions | Critical Studies

  • What do we mean by Text-type?

    A text-type conventions is both the major structure and format of the text, such as a speech, novel or poem, and the intent or function of that format.

    It is about the macrocosm or ‘big picture’ view. You should therefore look at stanzas, chapters, or soliloquy and act structure in your varied texts. You should also understand the relationship between the macrocosm and the microcosm, which might be sentence structure, use of grammar, or the individual shots of a film. Consider the ‘BIG PICTURE’ view: look at stanzas, chapters, soliloquies and act structure in your text.

    You will be expected to be aware of the ‘usual’ structure or general conventions employed by your text-type’s format, its usual purpose, and how your prescribed text meets the conventions in some ways and bends or breaks them in others.

    Understand the relationship between the big picture view and the small details:  sentence structure, use of grammar or the individual shots of a film.

    Be aware of the usual structure employed by your text-type’s format and how your text meets the conventions or breaks them.

     

  • The narrative

    Is any text-type where the intent is to tell a story.  It is based on perception in time: the events are given in chronological order. The main purpose of narrative is to entertain, to gain and hold the reader’s interest.

    Narratives may also be written to change attitudes and social opinions. Narratives differ from recounts because instead of simple retelling, a narrative sets up one or more problems, which the characters must eventually overcome.

    • Any text-type where the intent is to tell a story.
    • Events are given in chronological order.
    • Purpose is to entertain or to change social attitudes and opinions.
    • Narratives differ from recounts because instead of simple retelling, a narrative sets up one or more problems which the characters must eventually overcome.
  • The exposition

    Is any text type which intends to give an explanation. It may involve analysis or comparison of complex facts. Logical order will be important, and both theory and examples will be touched upon. Text-books, discussion essays, documentaries, oral presentations and some speeches are expository.

    • Any text-type which intends to give an explanation.
    • Involves analysis or comparison of complex facts.
    • Uses a logical order, theory and examples.
    • Text-books, discussion essays, documentaries, oral presentations and some speeches are expository.
  • The argument

    Is any text type which intends to present a point of view or an answer to a question or problem. It involves evaluation and subjective judgment of relevant information and refers to the reasons for or against. Analytical essays, most speeches, feature articles, political satire and comedy shows, and most formal letters are argumentative.

    • Any text-type which presents a point of view or answers a problem.
    • Involves evaluation and judgment of information, referring to the reasons for or against.
    • Analytical essays, most speeches, feature articles, political satire, comedy shows and most formal letters are argumentative.

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